Pages

Showing posts with label Transport. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Transport. Show all posts

Tuesday, 7 July 2015

Belfast Transport Hub - Neighbourhood Engagement Studio - Wed 8 July 2015

A Neighbourhood Engagement Studio considering the proposed new Belfast Transport Hub at Great Victoria Street will take place on Wednesday 8th July 2015 at the Ulster Hall, Bedford Street, Belfast. The event is facilitated by architect Declan Hill on behalf of the Sandy Row Community Forum.

To facilitate attendance presentations take place at 1pm and 6pm. Informal presentations and workshop discussions take place between 2pm and 5.30pm.


Timetable:

1pm - Presentation 1
  • Introduction: Glenda Davies
  • Background: Declan Hill
  • The Hub: Translink, John McAslan and Partners, Arup Associates.
  • Questions / Observations

2pm - Studio Groups

3pm - Coffee / Tea

3.30pm - Studio Groups

6pm - Presentation 2
  • As Presentation 1

7pm - Studio Groups

7.45pm - Summary and Way Forward

8pm - End

Tuesday, 7 April 2015

Book Launch: The Railway Photographs of Norman Johnston - 22 April 2015


Colourpoint Books invite you to the launch of "The Railway Photographs of Norman Johnston".

The book launch will be held at the Malone House, Belfast on Wednesday 22 April 2015, 7.00pm for 7.30pm. Light refreshments will be served.



Norman is widely regarded as one of Ireland’s foremost railway historians, and has amassed a huge collection of remarkable photographs of Irish railways. This book includes some of what Norman regarded as the best or most interesting images that he took during the pivotal period between 1964 and 1973. The pictures are presented in roughly chronological order and include some CIE as well as UTA and NIR. All are accompanied by extended captions.

Norman began writing the book during the last two months of his life, completing the manuscript just seven days before his death on 31 August 2014. This book is both a fascinating record of Irish railways during this formative period, and a fitting tribute to a man who has contributed much to both the transport scene and the lives of those who knew him.

Please RSVP to Denise Martin by emailing [email protected], or phoning 028 9182 0505.

Tuesday, 6 January 2015

Belfast Transport Hub Consultation Campaign Launched

Translink, in conjunction with the Department for Regional Development, are working to explore the opportunity of creating a new integrated transport hub in Belfast on the site of the current Europa Buscentre and Great Victoria Street Rail Station. 

The Hub will be designed to cater for forecast passenger demand, alleviate constraints on the network, improve operational performance and enhance the passenger journey experience.


It is envisioned to be a modern, multi-modal, transport interchange that will enhance the environment, serve the community and better support the local economy. It will combine bus and rail termini with interfaces to private car, taxi, bus and cycle modes whilst acknowledging Metro bus and Belfast Rapid Transit.

A design team has been appointed comprising Arup and John McAslan + Partners, who have an extensive portfolio in the development and delivery of modern and highly-efficient transport infrastructure facilities including Kings Cross Station in London.

Translink and the Department for Regional Development are now inviting members of the public to have their say on proposals for ‘The Belfast Hub’.

A public consultation campaign, ‘Making History’, has been launched inviting views on The Belfast Hub, which aims to regenerate and develop a new city quarter - 'Station Quarter'.


Public information sessions will take place on Thursday 15th and Friday 16th January 2015, 8am - 6pm, in the Europa Buscentre where Translink representatives and The Hub’s appointed design team will share detail on options for the project and aspirations for bus and train facilities. An online submission form is also available at www.translink.co.uk/thehub.

As part of this consultation process, Translink is also seeking ‘station stories’ relating to individual experiences and memories of the existing bus and rail stations at the site, past and present. Since the project was announced, the project team has been on a journey of discovery uncovering a wealth of interesting ‘stories’ spanning the existence of both facilities and reflecting their rich history and impact on people’s lives. The public information sessions will feature just a few of these station stories to inspire more people to share their own nostalgic tales and help form a rich tapestry of reflection as The Hub project gains momentum.

This first phase of consultation will be open until 31st January 2015. For more information on the project click www.translink.co.uk/thehub.

Thursday, 22 November 2012

NI Executive agree to proceed with £98.5m Belfast Rapid Transit system

The Northern Ireland Executive has today endorsed the Department for Regional Development’s Outline Business Case for the Belfast Rapid Transit system. The document identifies the recommended network routes, procurement strategy and business model for Belfast Rapid Transit.

From www.drdni.gov.uk.

Thursday, 1 March 2012

Connecting Places Mini Series: Bicycling Belfast: Part 4: Beyond Commuting - Active Travel and Local Economies

In this series, Connecting Places, we explore the spaces, places and sustainable transport systems in Belfast and beyond, with an aim to generate critical debate on the design of our towns and cities.
Series curated by Aaron Coulter 

For previous posts from this series click here


Part 4: Beyond Commuting - Active Travel and Local Economies



Active Travel and Local Economies
(Credit: Aaron Coulter)
Naturally, a lot of focus throughout this week has been placed on bicycle access to Belfast City Centre. One reason for this is the fact that most of the statistical information gathered regards commuting and 19.5% of all trips taken in Northern Ireland, by all modes, are to get to work (TSNI, P23, 2008-2010).


However, a significant percentage of journeys are also made for shopping (20.1%) and Leisure (22.5%) (TSNI, P23, 2008-2010). Tackling these trips, as well as the more obvious commuting trips, could be a highly beneficial strategy for our ailing local centres in Belfast.


In this penultimate post of Bicycling Belfast, we will investigate the potential regenerative effect of improving levels of access for both the bicycle and pedestrian to our local centres.


Wednesday, 29 February 2012

Connecting Places Mini Series: Bicycling Belfast: Part 3: Belfast - a bicycle city in the making?

In this series, Connecting Places, we explore the spaces, places and sustainable transport systems in Belfast and beyond, with an aim to generate critical debate on the design of our towns and cities.
Series curated by Aaron Coulter 

For previous posts from this series click here

Part 3: Belfast - A cycling city in the making?
‘Belfast is a city for cyclists; it has all the advantages of cycling in Amsterdam but without the swarms of other bicycles. This Victorian city, steeped in culture and industrial heritage, is just waiting to be discovered by bike.' 
Source: Go to Belfast 

In part 3 of Bicycling Belfast we will be investigating the city’s current cycling infrastructure to find out how close to reality this statement is. Is Belfast really a city for cyclists, or is the comparison to Amsterdam just a bit too far fetched?

Belfast - a city for cyclists?
(Credit: Aaron Coulter)

Tuesday, 28 February 2012

Connecting Places Mini Series: Bicycling Belfast: Part 2: An International Perspective

In this series, Connecting Places, we explore the spaces, places and sustainable transport systems in Belfast and beyond, with an aim to generate critical debate on the design of our towns and cities.
Series curated by Aaron Coulter

For previous posts from this series click here 

Part 2: An International Perspective

Broadly speaking, cycling cities can be split into two categories - ‘traditional’ cycling cities such as Copenhagen and Amsterdam and then those who have recently taken up the challenge to improve cycling conditions such as New York, London and Dublin (among many others). In this article we will be asking ‘What can Belfast learn from these cities?’

Copenhagen
(Credit: Blue Granola)

Monday, 27 February 2012

Connecting Places Mini Series: Bicycling Belfast: Part 1: Debunking the Myth

In this series, Connecting Places, we explore the spaces, places and sustainable transport systems in Belfast and beyond, with an aim to generate critical debate on the design of our towns and cities.
Series curated by Aaron Coulter

For background info on Bicycling Belfast click here.

Part 1: Debunking the Myth
“As a result of varying levels of congestion, topography and land-use, a blanket citywide approach to providing a cycle network is unlikely to be appropriate in Belfast.” 
Bicycling Belfast
(Credit: Aaron Coulter)
In a country where 65% of all trips taken are under 5 miles in distance, and in a city where up to 70% of inhabitants in some inner city areas do not have access to a car, can we really say that cycling should have no significant future in Belfast? What if we take an more analytical approach to the somewhat subjective claims put forward by DRD? Does Belfast have what it takes to become a ‘cycling city’, or are there too many obstacles in the way? 


Friday, 24 February 2012

Connecting Places Mini Series: Bicycling Belfast

In this series, Connecting Places, we explore the spaces, places and sustainable transport systems in Belfast and beyond, with an aim to generate critical debate on the design of our towns and cities.
Series curated by Aaron Coulter

Bicycling Belfast: Prelude



Cycling accounts for 0.6% of trips in NI
(Credit: Aaron Coulter)


In recent years there has been a renewed interest from major cities throughout the world in diversifying transportation choices in an effort to reduce dependancy on the private car and improve quality of life for their citizens. These initiatives are often characterised with a rebalancing of capital expenditure priorities in order to accommodate higher levels of spending on more sustainable forms of transport, including walking, cycling, and public transit schemes.

However, despite over a decade of policy initiatives aimed at reducing car dependency in Northern Ireland, transport budgets here are still overwhelmingly in favour of the private car. In 2010 the then Minister for Regional Development, Conor Murphy, not only dedicated 62% of the overall transport budget to the car, a total of £250,000,000, but also cut Belfast’s cycling budget by 98% to £8,000 (Belfast Telegraph). Given this, it is unsurprising that Belfast is currently rated the 3rd most congested city in the United Kingdom and ranks within the top ten most congested cities in Europe.

It is in within this context, and as part of an ongoing process of generating debate on sustainable transport in Northern Ireland through the Connecting Places series, that throughout next week a mini series titled ‘Bicycling Belfast’ will investigate the potential of increasing cycling’s modal share in the city.

Join us next week on the PLACE blog and follow the conversation with Aaron on Twitter #bicyclingbelfast

Friday, 23 December 2011

Connecting Places: Bus Rapid Transit - panacea or placebo?

In this series, Connecting Places, we explore the spaces, places and sustainable transport systems in Belfast and beyond, with an aim to generate critical debate on the design of our towns and cities.


Series curated by Aaron Coulter
Article by Aaron Coulter and Gary Potter


The deadline to be involved in the public consultation on Belfast's proposed Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) routes is coming to a close on 6th January 2012. The routes and accompanying documentation can be viewed until 6th January in the city centre at Department for Regional Development, and in East and West Belfast at the East Belfast Partnership and West Belfast Partnership respectively.


Transport Minister Danny Kennedy, in outlining the reasoning for the introduction of a BRT system,  states:
"We need a transportation system that can accommodate the future demands of Belfast, both its people and businesses. We need to reprioritise how we travel and change our travel behaviour to encourage a shift away from the private car and towards public transport. By working together we can make public transport, into, within and across Belfast, safer, cleaner and more attractive for everyone."
http://www.northernireland.gov.uk/121011-drd-rapid-transit-network?WT.mc_id=rss-news

It would be hard to find fault with the statement above, but as the deadline for public consultation on the proposed routes draws near, one key question comes to the fore: will the BRT be the cure to Belfast's transportation woes?

Bus Rapid Transit - the solution?
Google Images

Thursday, 22 December 2011

New Routemaster hits the streets of London: NI Creative Industries at work


The new routemaster. Image via Magnus D on Flickr.

The new Routemaster is on the streets of London, designed by Heatherwick Studio and built in Northern Ireland by Wrightbus.

"This demonstrates in a very visible way the value of the Creative Industries as supported by the current Programme for Government," says PLACE Director Michael Hegarty. "Architecture and public spaces are also currently being designed here for cities such as Copenhagen."

Read More
Fast Code Design: "London's Futuristic New Double-Decker Bus Hits The Streets" (Dec 21st 2011)
Northern Builder Magazine: Profile of Hackett Hall McKnight Architects (Issue 2, 2011)

Wednesday, 21 December 2011

Save Dublin's Cycle Officer

It was announced last week that Dublin is set to lose its Cycling Officer, Ciaran Fallon. He is currently the only Cycling Officer in any of the City Councils in Ireland. This position played a key role in promoting cycling in the city, just recently voted 9th most bike friendly city in the world by Copenhagenize (Irish Times, September 2011). If the post is lost it will be a devastating blow for cycling in Dublin. But it could also set a trend for decision makers in Northern Ireland.

There's an online petition which can let you show your support for improving cycling in Dublin and beyond.


Full details via The Irish Times: http://tiny.cc/ap2hs

Online petition: http://tiny.cc/ysakq
Campaign Informaton: http://tiny.cc/2hp4h
Twitter: #dublincycling

Wednesday, 7 December 2011

Connecting Places: What is the cost of free parking?

In this series, Connecting Places, we explore the spaces, places and sustainable transport systems in Belfast and beyond, with an aim to generate critical debate on the design of our towns and cities.

Series curated by Aaron Coulter

Last week Transport Minister Danny Kennedy announced free on-street parking in Belfast, Lisburn and Newry city centres, coming into effect from Monday 5th December until 24th December, with fees being suspended from 4.30pm Monday to Friday and all day on Saturdays.

The decision has been largely met with approval by consumers and retailers alike, with retailers anticipating an increase in sales in the run up to Christmas due to the perceived ease of access to the city centre for those arriving by car.

However, is there a cost associated with free parking, and if so, what is it?

'No Coins? No Problem!'

Tuesday, 5 October 2010

My PLACE: Stephen Pollock

In this series, we ask practitioners, experts and enthusiasts for their take on Northern Ireland's built environment - where are we now, how did we get here, and where are going?

Stephen Pollock, Roads Service, Department for Regional Development

Q. The DRD minister last week announced some major changes to traffic in central Belfast - is the car no longer the preferred mode of transport?

Last week Regional Development Minister Conor Murphy launched the consultation process for an ambitious Traffic Masterplan for Belfast city centre entitled ‘Belfast on the Move.’ This plan aims to substantially reduce traffic levels in the city centre and provide more road space for public transport, pedestrians and cyclists.

Around 30,000 vehicles per day travel through the city centre on the streets either side of City Hall. About 60% of this is through traffic, with no final destination in the city centre, causing needless congestion.

By providing the alternatives and promoting their use, we can encourage people to change how they travel. As they switch in significant enough numbers, congestion can be reduced and business, the economy and the environment will all benefit, and whilst we need to continue to provide real alternatives to the car, we also need people to choose to use them. We need behavioural change.

That said, we have to be pragmatic. There is a balance to be struck. Transport needs to be a catalyst for growth, not a constraint. We need to have the right infrastructure to allow people and goods to move, supporting our economies as we move out of recession.

The vision for Belfast is to achieve a city centre where access by public transport is given a much higher priority than at present and a street environment tailored to the needs of pedestrians rather than the private car.

***

Related: Further details on the proposals can be found on the Belfast On The Move website

Thursday, 30 September 2010

Belfast On The Move: new transport plans for Belfast

Image via Gryts on Flickr
News from DRD on their new Belfast on the Move proposals, which will seek "to develop a sustainable transport system to serve the central area. This will be focused on improved public transport services, better facilities for walking and cycling and a reduction in the dominance of travel by private car."

***

30 September 2010
Radical shake up for traffic in Belfast City Centre announced

Transport Minister Conor Murphy today launched the consultation process for an ambitious Traffic Masterplan for Belfast city centre entitled ‘Belfast on the Move’.

It aims to substantially reduce traffic levels in the city centre and provide more road space for public transport, pedestrians and cyclists.

The Minister said: “Belfast city centre has been transformed in recent years with major regeneration and retail redevelopments. A thriving city centre needs a transport system that not only encourages the use of more sustainable transport to reduce congestion but also enhances the environment for those who shop, visit, work and live in Belfast city centre. 

“Around 30,000 vehicles per day travel through the city centre on the streets either side of City Hall. About 60% of this is through traffic, with no final destination in the city centre causing needless congestion. This Traffic Masterplan for Belfast aims to substantially reduce those traffic levels and provide more road space for public transport, pedestrians and cyclists.

“My vision is to achieve a city centre where access by public transport is given a much higher priority, and to create a safe street environment tailored to the needs of pedestrians rather than the private car. Over 40% of households in Belfast do not have access to a private car and therefore rely on public transport. For the city centre to thrive, people need to be able to access goods and services swiftly and efficiently and public transport will play an increasingly important role in this as non essential traffic is redirected away from the central area. 

“The Belfast on the Move proposals will promote a safe, sustainable and efficient transport system within Belfast City Centre. ”

The proposed ‘Sustainable Transport Enabling Measures’ will require the redistribution of available road space in the city centre in favour of public transport, pedestrians and cyclists. Improvements will be made to the road network to the west of the central area to provide an alternative route for northbound traffic. The longer term objectives of the Masterplan are to remove through traffic from the streets around City Hall so that it can be linked directly to Donegall Place and to improve public transport by facilitating cross-city bus routes and future Rapid Transit routes.

The Masterplan sets out the phased proposals which include:

· Northbound through traffic re-routed from Great Victoria Street onto Hope Street and Durham Street with south bound traffic continuing to use Great Victoria Street. Grosvenor Road will become one-way westbound and College Square North one-way eastbound.

· The redistribution of existing road space will provide extensive bus priority measures for use by public transport, taxis and cyclists.

· The delivery of 20 new controlled pedestrian crossing points; about 2.6km of new bus lanes which will also accommodate cyclists and taxis; 340m of new dedicated service bays; 1km of new dedicated cycle lanes and over 40 additional dedicated disabled parking bays.

Lord Mayor, Councillor Pat Convery, welcomed the proposals and pointed out that Belfast City Council has recently published its own revised Transport Policy, providing a framework for it to lead by example and help shape transportation in the city in a sustainable, accessible and cost effective way for all those who live, visit and work in the city. 

He said: "The keymessage is to support and promote the development of a modern, safe, accessible and integrated transportation system to enhance the connectivity for Belfast and its wider regions. Our aim is to adopt a strong and public city leadership role in the promotion of sustainable transport for the city of Belfast.” 

Emphasising that this is the start of a process that will help to transform our city centre the Minister said: “The ‘Belfast on the Move’ Masterplan outlines the emerging proposals and identifies many of the difficult issues that will have to be considered in meeting this challenge. I would encourage anyone who visits, works or lives in Belfast City Centre to examine the Masterplan and put forward your views so that they can be fully considered in developing more detailed proposals.” 

Public consultation on the proposals will close on 30 November 2010. Further details are available by phoning 028 9025 3170 or at http://www.roadsni.gov.uk/index/belfast_on_the_move.htm

The public are invited to view the proposals at exhibitions to be held in Castlecourt Shopping Centre (Monday 4 - Wednesday 6 October 2010) and Victoria Square Shopping Centre (Thursday 7 - Friday 8 October 2010) and DRD offices at Clarence Court, 10-18 Adelaide St (Monday 11 - Friday 29 October 2010).

Notes to editors:

1. The Traffic Masterplan has been developed by DRD in conjunction with the Department for Social Development, Belfast City Council, Translink and other key stakeholders.

2. It is based on the proposals for the city centre outlined in the Belfast Metropolitan Transport Plan (BMTP) prepared by the Department for Regional Development and published in 2004. The BMTP proposed traffic management measures for the city centre with the objective of improving accessibility with the following four key concepts :
· A City Centre Ring creating an ‘urban boulevard’ to reduce its barrier effect between the core of the city centre and surrounding areas.
· A Civic Spine running through the core linking locations of key civic importance with reduced levels of general traffic and increased priority for public transport (centred on Wellington Place, Donegal Square North and Chichester St.).
· The Belfast Cross (based on the main central retail streets of Donegal Place/Royal Ave and High St/Castle St) with high levels of priority for pedestrians.
· High Accessibility Zones around public transport nodes in the city centre.

3. The key objectives of the Traffic Masterplan are to:
· Make it easier and safer to walk, particularly crossing streets.
· Reduce the level of traffic travelling through the central area.
· Reduce bus journey times and improve reliability.
· Reduce bus layover and dwell time.
· Facilitate future rapid transit proposals.
· Provide additional cycling facilities.
· Retain good levels of accessibilty for disabled users.
· Ensure reasonable provision for on street parking and servicing of shops and businesses.
· Provide further opportunities for public realm improvements and expansion of the pedestrian areas.

4. The Masterplan is closely linked to DSD’s ‘Streets Ahead’ public realm project and future proposals for a Rapid Transit system that will route through the city centre.

***


Monday, 7 June 2010

Water Taxis

"Other cities have ferry lines sprouting from every pier like weeds from pavement. Why not New York?"

The New York Times' City Critic suggests New York needs more water taxis. Perhaps this is something which could reinvigorate Belfast's Lagan as well?

NY Times: What New York Needs: More Water Taxis