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Showing posts with label Regeneration. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Regeneration. Show all posts

Wednesday, 13 January 2016

Planning, Regeneration and Development Seminar Series

Commencing Thursday 11 February 2016, 17.00 - 18.00
Ulster University, York Street, Belfast
Refreshments available in the foyer from 16.30

The Planning Team at Ulster University (UPLAN*) are running a new seminar series exploring issues in planning, regeneration and development.

Hosted by the Built Environment Research Institute (BERI) at Ulster University, the purpose of this seminar series is to bring together practitioners, researchers and students to promote good practice, exchange ideas and stimulate debate on planning, regeneration and development.

Seminars will be led by practitioners and researchers from Northern Ireland and beyond. The series aims to attract an inclusive audience and is open to anyone interested in engaging with contemporary planning issues. 

The series kicks off with a seminar entitled Creating value in planning and development - reflections on the balancing act, and will be delivered by BERI visiting Professor Diana Fitzsimons. 

The seminar is free to attend. To assist with catering, please RSVP by email to [email protected] 

Friday, 19 June 2015

Queen Street & Wellington Place, Belfast - Public Engagement Event - Mon 22 June, 12 - 8pm

A public engagement event will take place on Monday 22 June 2015, 12noon - 8pm at 29 Wellington Place (former Parsons and Parsons), Belfast BT1 6GS. 

The event is an early opportunity to learn about, and share your views on, a proposal for student accommodation at lands within the site bounded by 24 - 30 College Street, 41-49 Queen Street (formerly known as the Athletic Stores) and 29 Wellington Place (former Parsons & Parsons), Belfast. The proposal includes a mix of cluster beds with shared facilities and studios; ground floor uses including support facilities associated with the student accommodation and a bar; restaurant and cafe.

Further information relating to the proposals may be obtained from: Turley, Hamilton House, 3 Joy Street, Belfast BT2 8LE on behalf of Lacuna WJ Limited (Lacuna Developments & Watkin Jones Group).

If you wish to make comments on the proposals you may do so at the above event and / or in writing to Turley, Hamilton House, 3 Joy Street, Belfast BT2 8LE and no later than Friday 21 August 2015.

Click to enlarge.

Wednesday, 22 April 2015

Consultation: Draft Belfast City Council City Centre Regeneration Strategy & Investment Plan

There is just over one month left to have your say and help shape the emerging Belfast City Council City Centre Regeneration Strategy & Investment Plan.

The strategy is being developed by Urban Strategies for Belfast City Council. The strategy considers market and economic analysis of the city centre’s office market and retail offer, as well as priorities for tourism development and job creation. The strategy also considers issues such as pedestrian access, street furniture, tree planting, parks, bridges, car parks and city events.

It is intended that the strategy will influence the future local development plan for Belfast and direct how new regeneration functions the Council will acquire in April 2016 will be utilised. 


Download: Urban Strategies’ Belfast City Centre Initial Directions Paper (PDF - 5.7MB)

Download: Belfast City Centre Regeneration Strategy and Investment Plan (PDF - 10MB)

Consultation responses can be returned to Belfast City Council via email - [email protected]. Deadline for responses is Wednesday 28 May 2015.

Tuesday, 14 April 2015

Development of Brownfield Land - Wed 25 March 2015

Understand the Impact of Planning Reform & Better Assess & Manage Risks for Cost Effective Re-Development of Brownfield Land
Wednesday 25th March 2015, Belfast

Implementation of a major reform of the Planning System, and the transfer of planning functions to 11 new local councils in Northern Ireland, took pace on April 2015. The majority of contaminated land and groundwater is dealt with under the Planning regime, and so it is important that all professionals involved in brownfield development have a thorough understanding of this reform and the impact it will have.

Brownfield Briefing return to Belfast in March 2015 with a fully re-researched and updated conference, bringing together key players to discuss the implications of a new planning framework on the assessment and management of risks arising from contaminated land and groundwater on brownfield sites.

Hear first-hand practical advice on producing a risk assessment to support a planning application, how to scope your site investigation based on remedial objectives so you are only collecting - and paying for - the information you really need. Learn how to better understand and manage risks and develop appropriate verification measures to prove that any remediation undertaken is measurable and justifiable.

Packed with first-hand insights and practical case studies, this event will leave you with a better understanding of the way forward in managing and developing brownfield land in the new regime in just a few months’ time.

Click here to view the full programme


Former Sirocco works in Belfast.


Key topics include:
  • Update on the outcome of the Planning Reform and exploring the future for Planning and Development in Northern Ireland
  • Local Council Perspective: Contaminated Land Risk Assessment in the new Planning Process
  • Exploring brownfields as drivers for economic and social regeneration
  • Developer’s Perspective on planning and regulatory changes, brownfield challenges and solutions
  • Perspective & Case Studies from the DEFRA Expert Panel
  • Producing a robust, coherent and appropriate risk assessment to support a planning application
  • Strategies for achieving more accurate risk assessment of groundwater to minimise the impact of groundwater contamination on land use
  • Developing a robust, detailed and integrated risk assessment to enable appropriate remediation and increase cost-efficiencies
  • Waste Management: Assessing the impact of new Environmental & Waste regulation on the development of brownfield land
  • Asbestos: Strategies for the identification, remediation and re-use of asbestos-contaminated materials

Key speakers include:
  • Siobhan Cox, Queen's University, Belfast
  • Simon Kirk, Strategic Planning Division, Dept of the Environment
  • Kyle M Alexander OBE, Maze Long Kesh Development Corporation
  • John O’Connor, The Housing Agency, Republic of Ireland
  • Brian Kelly, Turley Associates
  • Theresa Kearney, Northern Ireland Environment Agency
  • Naomi Earl, Freelance Contaminated Consultant & Member of DEFRA Expert Panel
  • Graham Webb, Geosyntec
  • Cecilia Macleod, WYG
  • Yvonne Buchanan, WYG
  • Chris Piddington, Vertase FLI
  • James Macfarlane, Hydrock
  • Richard Yarnold, Hydrock

Date: 25 March 2015
Time: 9am - 5pm
Venue: Hilton Hotel, 4 Lanyon Place, Belfast, BT1 3LP

Wednesday, 18 March 2015

Belfast: Streets Ahead Phase 3 Consultation Event - Wed 18 March, 6pm - 9pm

The Department for Social Development are hosting a public consultation event on Wednesday 18th March 2015 in PLACE, Lower Garfield Street, Belfast. 

The purpose of the event is to inform the local community about the Belfast Streets Ahead Phase 3 project. The overall aim of the Phase 3 project is to design and implement public realm improvements (such as new paving, lighting, landscaping, street furniture and public artwork) that will deliver high quality streetscape and open spaces that will contribute positively to the economic and social vitality of the Belfast City Centre and will complement the Ulster University’s planned development of its new campus at York Street.

Draft proposals. Credit: www.dsdni.gov.uk

The Phase 3 project area will cover:
  • Royal Avenue (from Castle Place to Donegall Street),
  • York Street (from Donegall Street to Frederick Street/Great Patrick Street junction),
  • Frederick Street,
  • Library Square (Union Street, Little Donegall Street and Library Street),
  • Cathedral Gardens (aka Buoys Park),
  • the area around St Anne’s Cathedral (Talbot Street, Exchange Street West and Academy Street, including Donegall Street in front of St Anne’s Cathedral),
  • Great Patrick Street (part),
  • Curtis Street
  • York Lane
The consultation event will take place between 6pm and 9pm on Wednesday 18th March in PLACE, with a short presentation commencing at 7pm.

There will be an opportunity before and after the presentation to ask questions and get more information about the project. Further information on the Phase 3 project can be viewed on the DSD website. Comments on the proposals can be made at the event, by email to DSD at [email protected] or by writing to: DSD, 4th Floor, Oxford House, 49-55 Chichester Street, Belfast, BT1 4HH by 31st March 2015.

Wednesday, 18 February 2015

Boom! Collective & Studio repurpose vacant building in Bangor


Boom! Collective & Studio have repurposed the top floor of the former Clinton Cards building on 80 Main Street, Bangor, transforming it from vacant to vibrant. Three creative practitioners, Marianne Kennerley (Multi-discipline designer), Katie Mitchell (Garden designer/illustrator/photographer) and Jo Hatty, (Scultptor/artist) were inspired by their residencies at Project 24 and joined forces to create a workspace of their own for freelance local creatives. 


Boom! Collective & Studios is set up as a social enterprise with five studio spaces and a gallery space, a materials co-op and a creative reference library. They aspire to be a base for the creative industries to meet and share experiences in the heart of Bangor and through repurposing this vacant building, to assist in regenerating the town centre.


Wee Residencies....

Over the 13th,14th, 15th of March, Boom! Collective & Studios are opening their doors and inviting applications for its first Wee Residencies.
Wee Residencies is a collection of sixteen creative residencies taking place in the newly established Boom! Studios. Along with a symbolic funding of £2.00, Wee Residencies will provide access to a Boom! space for a period of 2 hours at an allotted time over the weekend with the outcomes exhibited in the Boom Gallery.

For more information, including the Artists Brief please contact: [email protected]

Twitter:@B00M_Collective
Facebook: Boom-Studios


Tuesday, 8 October 2013

Have Your Say: Ebrington Development Framework Consultation

Ilex is seeking your views on the regeneration of the Ebrington site in Derry~Londonderry.

Works completed to date include the development of Cunningham Square and Ebrington Square and the Peace Bridge and the refurbishment of building 71. Buildings 80 and 81 are currently being fitted out as temporary exhibition space for the Turner Prize 2013 and ultimately as a hub for the creative industries.

Ebrington, Derry~Londonderry

Mel Higgins, Interim Chief Executive of Ilex explained: “A development framework for the 26-acre site is currently under way to ensure sustainable development in the short, medium and long term. Ebrington will seek to attract inward investment and offer a variety of economic, social and cultural benefits,whilst being carefully integrated with the city's One Plan, which forms the basis for future development in the city. We’re therefore keen to engage with local community groups, residents, businesses and individuals, to hear their ideas, and address any concerns they may have."

The second phase of consultation will commence in November, after which an outline planning application for the entire site will be submitted in January 2014.

For more information: http://www.ilex-urc.com/Sites/Ebrington/Ebrington-Development-Framework---Public-Consultat.aspx

Click here to have your say online. The deadline for responses is 5pm on Friday 25th October 2013.

Tuesday, 27 November 2012

DSD Launch BT1 Gateway Belfast Development Proposal

The Department for Social Development is seeking public comment for a key gateway site to Belfast city centre - BT1 Gateway. The 1.2 acre site is located at the junction of Carrick Hill and North Street and entirely within public ownership.

BT1 Gateway. Credit: DSD.

Library Square, Belfast Public Realm Consultation

The Department for Social Development, Benoy, Peter Brett Associates and Drivers Jonas Deloitte have developed a public realm scheme over the past six months with key stakeholders for Library Square, Belfast. 

The space is located at the junction of Library Street and Royal Avenue near Central Library and the University of Ulster. With proximity to these civic buildings in mind the designers intends to reflect a communications and learning theme. The team intend to promote the use of media and social connectivity by providing public access to wireless internet and installing a media wall to the side of Central Library. 

Library Square Public Realm Scheme. Credit: DSD.

Friday, 21 September 2012

City Shapers: Dr. Callie Persic

CITY SHAPERS: What's Your Role?

Whether your role is architect, community representative, cyclist or citizen, we all have a part to play in shaping the city around us, from big scale planning to small scale interventions. In this series, we meet the people making a difference in Belfast and beyond.

Dr. Callie Persic is originally from the United States. After coming to Belfast to complete her PhD in Anthropology at Queen’s University, she now resides here and works for the West Belfast Partnership Board (WBPB). She spoke to Ailish Killilea who volunteers at PLACE and works as an urban designer with Forum for Alternative Belfast.

***

How long have you worked with WBPB and what is your role?
I have worked at the WBPB for the last seven and a half years and am the Strategic Regeneration Manager. The Partnership is a cross-sector partnership that works across a number of themes. Specifically my remit covers Housing, Environment & Planning and Economic Development & Neighbourhood Renewal. There are five Area Partnerships in Belfast and I have strong relationships across the city with my colleagues.

How do you find working with the Partnership Board and what type of projects do you deal with?
I like working in the Partnership, I actually like working with different people and in different sectors - I get quite a buzz out of that. Because my remits are so wide, I could work on a number of things. Regeneration is many things linked together. In relation to economic development, I work with a very strong committee, what we are looking at is how to support local creative industries, small businesses and SMEs (small & medium enterprises).

This can be localised or can reach city wide. We work on community development model that can help local traders and creative industries get a head start for example we have supported the West Belfast Traders Forum and the tourism initiative Fáilte Feirste Thiar, which are now operating independently.


"Regeneration is many things linked together"

In terms of spatial regeneration, housing and environmental planning, I think we could do so much more - but resources can limit the expanse of our projects. The progress of this work comes in peaks and valleys depending on [whether] there are resources. It can be very frustrating as it can take years to see something happen.

That said, the work is very interesting and we have many projects on the go in the West. Currently the Glen 10 Development Framework is out to community consultation and the Andersontown Barracks is another huge and very interesting project, something we have worked on with PLACE. We organised the community consultation for that — it is a former military site and the redevelopment of is hugely important for Belfast as it is part of conflict transformation and the use of space.

In terms of local work I sit on each of the Neighbourhood Partnerships, there are 5 of them in West Belfast. It is important to be able to support local renewal as well as strategic and wider reaching regeneration.

Callie Persic outside the West Belfast Partnership Board. Picture by Ailish Killilea.

You recently set up the Pop up shop in West Belfast, which was very successful. How did you find setting it up and running it?
The Pop Up Shop (Síopa Sealadach) was result of a number of things coming together—support for the creative industries, addressing empty shops and linking into the increased footfall during the Féile and seizing an opportunity. Our neighbours, SCA (Springfield Charitable Association), very kindly gave us use of the space prior to them moving into their new premises. We were very lucky as I’m aware setting up a pop up is not always that easy.

The shop was opened by the DCAL Minister Carál Ni Chuilín on the 30th of July and it ran until the 12th of August. I am delighted by the success of the shop—there was a great sense of excitement and a ‘can do’ attitude. Something like this had not been done on the Falls Road before and it generated a lot of interest and publicity.

"...we want to make sure there are good quality services to help people who really need it."

It was a great project to be involved in and I am delighted to report that the creatives involved ‘re-popped’ after the space on the Falls Road closed - they are temporarily located on 155 Northumberland Street across from the International Wall. What is great about the pop up shop is that it gives creatives the opportunity to test out their business to the market and make a go of it until they can afford to take on their own unit.

Are there any new projects in the pipeline that you are particularly interested in?
We have a lot going on across all the themes in the Partnership and I am interested in how we can carry out regeneration of Belfast through more effective collaboration. Our remit is to work with the worst 10% - we want to make sure there are good quality services to help people who really need it.

In terms of economic development we have been working towards a better relationship with InvestNI, recently embarking on a piece of work together drawing up an investment proposition for West Belfast, which will be extremely useful as we seek investment and promote tourism.

On a wider city scale, we have been part of the FAB Summer School 2012, looking at how West and East Belfast connect to the city centre. Analysis showed how poorly the West connects to the city, especially in the ‘Shatterzone’ area on Divis Street. I was glad to see this year comparative work to other cities and an evidence-based approach, which helped inform my thinking as to the future needs of the city and our communities. That is a project where leadership is necessary in how you take that forward. It will need multiple partners lining up their plans and resources.

How would you unwind after a long day?
I volunteer in my spare time - I am the Chair of Skegoneill Glandore Common Purpose, an interface organisation in North Belfast. I really enjoy it because the projects are so interesting but is very similar to my professional career and so I need to find other ways to take a break and unwind.

I do Bikram Yoga in the Conway Mill. It is physically intense but I find it very relaxing and focuses me. I like walking around the city, taking pictures and exploring the city. Best of all though is when I am just chilled out with friends—going for walks or meeting up and having tea and cakes!

Interview at WBPB HQ. Picture by Ailish Killilea

As a child, what did you want to be when you grew up?
I wanted to be so many things—in fact I still do! I initially thought I would be a medical doctor but maybe because I moved so much I became interested in other cultures and in the end I settled on anthropology. My undergraduate degree is in philosophy but I went on to study anthropology and this is what brought me to Belfast. My PhD thesis looked at women, power, feminism and identity.


"I really believe in Belfast."

What book are you reading at the moment?
I usually have about 3 or 4 books on the go and I just finished the most recent Deborah Harkness book—which is a real curl-up-on-the-sofa book. But I also have been reading 'Welcome to the Urban Revolution'—It’s useful to read case studies about urban development and look at practices elsewhere—I’m really interested in cities, looking at cities and how they work. I think even you can read a little at the end of each day, it is so beneficial. Also I just re-read 'The Importance of Being Earnest' and it is such a brilliant play and makes me laugh out loud. I always have more books I want to read than time to enjoy them.

I also find I’m reading more and more on my phone, getting digestible articles, that if I have a moment, I can drop in and out of.

If you could invite 5 famous people to dinner, dead or alive, who would they be?
I was trying to get it down to five! Oscar Wilde is a must, Hilary Clinton, Amelia Peabody, David Attenborough, Nan Goldin (her work is so edgy and different) and Robert Plant - because of my love for Led Zeppelin.

If you were in charge, what changes would you make to Belfast as a city?
I really believe in Belfast. I believe in the greatness of Belfast. I would like to see Belfast thrive and be its own thing and not become just another city that you could find anywhere. My vision for Belfast is to have a better connected city in every way - that people feel connected to each other and the city and that there is a better sense of collective ownership. I think there are many aspects to this because it’s about transport, employment, public spaces, mental maps and challenging our own behavior and patterns. I would also like to see a change in the city in terms of a better balance of gender equality with more women involved at leadership levels, making decisions and having some influence in how the city takes shape.

***

If you or someone you know is a City Shaper, in Belfast or across Northern Ireland, we'd love to talk to you. Contact [email protected]

Wednesday, 18 July 2012

Consultation opens for a new Urban Regeneration and Community Development Policy Framework

The Department for Social Development, responsible for Urban Regeneration in Northern Ireland has opened a public consultation process for a new Urban Regeneration and Community Development Policy Framework.

The Framework will determine the priorities for urban regeneration and community development policies and programmes over the coming years. These are more familiar in the shape of large projects like the Victoria Square development, Public Realm improvements in town centres and Neighbourhood Renewal activity.

The Victoria Square Comprehensive Development Scheme was initially
chosen by the Social Development Minister in July 2000, following an
assessment of four city centre sites, and officially adopted by the
Department in January 2003. Construction began in 2004 on the largest
single investment ever in Belfast and was completed in Early 2007.

Commenting on the beginning of the public consultation process Minister McCausland said:

Wednesday, 22 February 2012

The Past in the Present: Titanic Quarter's Journey

In this series, The Past in the Present, we explore how the historic urban character of a city can be part of a dynamic and continually evolving contemporary society, with an aim to spark debate on the topic of conservation and heritage in our cities and further afield.

Series curated by Ailish Killilea and Anna Skoura.

We are living in the year of the Centennial anniversary of Titanic, since it departed Belfast on its maiden voyage across the Atlantic Ocean. The following article explores some the Titanic's history, how some of the heritage buildings are put to use today and the future development for Queen's Island.


S.S. Titanic, April 1912. (picture via The Modern History Blog)

Saturday, 30 April 2011

Invitation from Causeway Museum Service

Information on an arts programme as part of conservation work on Coleraine's Market Yard below.


Street sign on the Market Yard. Image via Albert Bridge.


Causeway Museum Service would like to extend an invitation to amateur artists in any medium to take part in a unique project for the Market Yard, Coleraine. 
Photographers, painters, sculptors, writers and poets are all welcome. They will have the opportunity to observe and record a major heritage development and take part in a historic exhibition. 
The Market Yard was built in Coleraine in 1829 to take the thriving agricultural trade out of the town centre. For 150 years it was a commercial hub. It was also a meeting place where people met to trade stories and ideas. 
The Market Yard has been closed off and derelict for some time, but is about to undergo a rebirth. Conservation work on the structures will commence shortly to make the Yard accessible. Council are currently awaiting a decision on major funding to build a new museum and other facilities within the soon to be restored site. 
The conservation works programme will be making a technical record. However Causeway Museum Service would love to see how artists would observe and portray any aspect of the project before the conservation works commences. 
All amateur artists are invited to join a group which will have unique access to the Yard. All work produced will be eligible for selection for a major exhibition. 
An inaugural meeting will take place at Coleraine Town Hall Council Chamber on Thursday 12th May at 7.30pm . 
This will provide a chance to learn the background to the project and discuss ideas for the programme. 
Please contact us if you are interested in the project, even if you cannot attend the meeting.
John Hamilton on 028 7034 7235 or email [email protected]

Saturday, 11 September 2010

EPLANI Event: DSD's Role in Urban Regeneration

DSD's Role in Urban Regeneration
Tues 21st September 2010
NICVA


Click the flyer above to enlarge.

Saturday, 12 June 2010

"The reason why it was built was no longer there..."

A fascinating report from Thursday's Hearts & Minds explores Belfast's depopulation and disconnection. The Forum for Alternative Belfast repeat their calls for a return to city centre living.

BBC iPlayer: Hearts & Minds 10th June 2010 (starts at 11m 18s; available until 17th June)

Tuesday, 4 May 2010

RPS Group to prepare a masterplan for Limavady town centre

The RPS Group have been named as masterplanners in the Limavady town centre regeneration.

30 April 2010 - Design experts announced for Limavady town centre

The Department for Social Development today announced the appointment of international urban design experts, the RPS Group, to prepare a masterplan for Limavady town centre, marking another important step towards producing a masterplan for the area

The masterplan will inform the priorities for development in the town centre and provide in particular:

* an agreed strategy for town centre development;
* an assessment of the development potential of vacant and underused sites within the town centre; and
* suggestions for public realm enhancements to support the regeneration objectives and complement the recommendations for restructuring and redevelopment of various buildings/sites.

Social Development Minister Margaret Ritchie said: "The appointment of consultants with international experience to prepare a town centre masterplan marks an important phase in the overall regeneration of Limavady. My Department is committed to working with Limavady Borough Council and other statutory organisations to help regenerate the town centre. This detailed masterplan will form the basis for strategic and integrated regeneration activities in the coming years."

Councillor Cathal Ó hOisín, Mayor of Limavady Borough Council said: "This is an exciting announcement for Limavady, especially at a time when rural towns such as ours continue to struggle during the economic downturn. We look forward to working with the Department for Social Development and engaging the local community to play their part in this new development. I am sure that councillors, residents and business people will recognise what an important opportunity this is for Limavady - we encourage everyone to participate in this important project."

Work to prepare the masterplan will commence immediately and is expected to be completed before the end of the year.

View the press release here.

Friday, 9 April 2010

"Bank Square Regeneration" from NvTv

Bank Square Regeneration from Northern Visions/NvTv on Vimeo.


Northern Visions have produced this video documenting the regeneration efforts at Bank Square. The video highlights the multiple interests in the area. Raymond Holbeach of RPS outlines the RPS scheme while several others give their responses, some of which are below:

Raymond Holbeach, RPS
- Extending Streets Ahead project from nearby Royal Avenue.
- RPS scheme is a kickstart to the regeneration of the area.
- Looked at the other squares in Belfast - good and bad things

Declan Hill, Forum for Alternative Belfast
- Talked about FAB's plans for the square.
- Reducing size of Castlecourt service yard; adding small units along its exterior.

Joby Fox, King Street Arts
- Reopening Berry Street is key.
- Disenfranchised physically from Royal Avenue.

Rita Harkin, UAHS
- "When you've got a focus on this area through a masterplan, we shouldn't just be looking at the surface treatment. [Issues like reopening Berry Street] will unlock the street and enliven it."

Bob McCoubrey, Mourne Seafood Bar
- "We want people to come in and say, this feels like Belfast; this doesn't feel like Brussels or London or Milton Keynes. It feels like something unique to Belfast. And what they gave us is something very bland."

The submission to the West Side Regeneration District Draft Regeneration Plan, hosted by PLACE in September 2008 is available for download from the PLACE site: click here.

Friday, 12 March 2010

Belfast architecture special on Arts Extra last night


Above: The Forum for Alternative Belfast's map of the "missing city" of Belfast - you can pick up a copy at PLACE

Last night's Arts Extra on BBC Radio Ulster featured three Belfast voices in architecture and regeneration.

One of the major problems with the current model of development is that "vast swathes of our local community...are unable to raise adequate criticism", says Doug Elliott. He objects particularly to the redevelopment of the Ulster Museum, and says the design of Victoria Square has a similarly detrimental effect on the city to that of the Castle Court shopping centre.

Mark Hackett also has his sights set on the area around CastleCourt, with the reopening of Berry Street and the redevelopment of Bank Square two of the key items on the agenda for the Forum for Alternative Belfast.

Meanwhile, Patricia Freedman discusses the work of the Cathedral Quarter Steering Group and some of the issues raised at Tuesday's panel discussion.

BBC iPlayer: Arts Extra 11/03/2010 (available for 6 more days)

Read more:
- BD Online: Final bid to halt Ulster Museum extension plan
- Belfast City of Quarters Conference - 25th & 26th March
- Forum for Alternative Belfast

Tuesday, 26 January 2010

Newsnight in Salford

Jeremy Paxman returns to Salford 10 years after first visiting the community to find out what impact attempts at regeneration have made on the area.

(The piece starts at 23m30s in - available on iPlayer until 1st February.)

BBC iPlayer - Newsnight 25/01/10