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Showing posts with label Ireland. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Ireland. Show all posts

Monday, 27 April 2015

Nimble Spaces Ways To Live Together: New Cultures of Housing - Friday 1 May 2015

Nimble Spaces Ways To Live Together: New Cultures of Housing is an international conference exploring participative design, spatial justice, social housing, co-housing and new ways to imagine housing in the 21st Century.


Studio Weave, Ecology of Colour. Image by Jim Stephenson

Are you someone with particular housing needs? Are you an architect / designer, researcher, artist, student, activist? Are you a group or an association of people who are tackling a particular housing issue? Are you a policy maker? Do you work supporting people around their housing needs? Are you interested in shared living? Are you interested in rethinking our town centres and rural landscapes as supportive living places? Let’s think collectively. Join Nimble Spaces on Friday 1st May 2015.

Date: Friday 1st May 2015
Time: 9.30am - 5.30pm
Venue: VISUAL Centre for Contemporary Art, Carlow
Tickets: €60 full price / €20 reduced price (students, seniors, unemployed, under-employed / precarious workers). Lunch by Luncheonette included in ticket cost.
Booking: visit visualcarlow.ie or call 059 9172400

The conference is a co-production between Nimble Spaces, Camphill Communities of Ireland, VISUAL Centre for Contemporary Art, Maynooth University Department of Geography and DIT, Dublin School of Architecture. Supported by Irish Design 2015 and the Arts Council.

The conference coincides with a presentation of film, images, and research materials from Nimble Spaces: Enabling Design, documenting long term collaborations between artists, architects and adults with a disability, considering ‘home’ and shared living. Participating artists, architects and filmmaker include Rhona Byrne, Paul Bokslag, LiD Architecture, Eamon Little, Meme Architecture, Jennie Moran, Ríonach Ní Néill and Studio Weave. Developed by Commonage in association with Camphill Communities of Ireland and funded through an Arts Council Arts Participation Project Award.


For the full conference programme and further information please visit www.nimblespaces.org.




Tuesday, 25 February 2014

2ha Magazine - Exploring the notion of the suburb

2ha - A recently launched independent journal plans to explore the notion of the suburb and its relationship to fields such as mapping, photography, language and typology. 

There is a value in suburbia the remains overlooked.  
It is a landscape of faded aristocratic homes surrounded by encroaching housing estates.
It is a field where farmyards sit beside shopping centres.
Quotes from: 2ha.ie


2ha - Exploring the suburb.


Issue five / suburbia + language - considers the relationship between language and suburban space. Three essays respond to the fractured process of translation that has come to define the territory of suburbia. 

  • Liam Mac Mathúna (Professor UCD) outlines a history of linguistic change in the Dublin area, describing how preceding eras of colonisations and cultures have renamed, subverted and built upon a place and its people. 
  • Emma Geoghegan (architect/lecturer DIT) documents the absence of a vocabulary in both the imagination and critique of space on the urban-rural fringe, suggesting that a consideration of this landscape as an independent territory might begin a means of understanding its unique conditions. 
  • Isobel NÍ Riain (lecturer UCC) reveals how a reading of place-names, in the now suburbanised area of Little Island on the edge of Cork city, can tell of a long history of occupation; one whose built form is often subsumed by the office parks and semi-ds of the immediate present.

To view Issue 05 and all previous issues, or to make a purchase, please visit www.2ha.ie/issues.

Tuesday, 11 May 2010

"A violent assault on our own country"

Writing in the Irish Times last week, Robert O'Byrne claims that the speculative building rush in the years leading to the recession has done irreparable harm both to Ireland's landscape and the country itself:

"We have to pay greater attention to the merits of good design and not merely regard it as an expendable extra. During the boom years many of our local authorities moved into new purpose-built premises designed to such high standards that they won awards. Yet those same authorities made no effort to encourage similar standards of good design in the areas under their jurisdiction. Architects will tell you that members of their profession were uninvolved in the majority of new housing erected during the past two decades. There was no requirement to call on an architect’s services and as a result almost all recent construction work in the domestic housing market is shamefully ugly and a blot on the landscape into which it has been inconsiderately dropped."

Irish Times: Physical fabric of our country left in tatters (5th May)

More:
Facebook: The Irish Georgian Society's page

(Thanks to Rosemary for the link.)