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Showing posts with label 2016. Show all posts
Showing posts with label 2016. Show all posts

Wednesday, 4 January 2017

Living in Belfast: A study in housing - Open Call for exhibition proposals

PLACE and Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios 

Introduction
Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios and PLACE are pleased to issue an Open Call for proposals for an artwork on the theme of ‘housing’.
Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios is a UK based architectural practice whose urban planning and architecture are deeply engaged in how cities evolve, support communities and prosper.  The practice works on a broad range of projects which focus on design excellence and the practical issues of knitting together fractured cities, addressing climate change, and supporting the development of sustainable educational buildings.   The 38 year old practice currently employs over 200 staff, focusing on education, master planning, housing and urban design. 
PLACE is an independent not-for-profit organisation dedicated to promoting great architecture, design and planning in Northern Ireland. Our purpose is to create a better place to live, work and play. We work with various types of organisations, institutions and government department across Northern Ireland to encourage high standards of design and engineering, and increase public engagement with their built environment to promote community development and healthier societies.

Context/theme
Belfast has development potential unlike any other UK regional city.  This allows the city to reinvent itself but the reasons for its development potential also present a distinct set of problems; the models applied to foster the development of other cities may be applicable in part but significant issues associated with transport, land values, tenure and government structure present the need to create bespoke solutions.
The wheels of government have successfully delivered or facilitated major projects such as the Titanic Quarter, Victoria Square and, in the near term, the Ulster University’s Belfast City Campus.  Equally, there are projects which are challenging to deliver owing to the economic context.  All of these projects are large in scale and therefore, should they fail to be realised, impact large areas of the city.
‘Iconic’, ‘landmark’ and ‘gateway’ projects dot the city but the background fabric of the city itself is anemic.  While there are pockets of the city which capture a sense of vibrancy and are constantly active, the city generally appears to be tentatively occupied and used solely to support office workers or spots of night time economy including restaurants, bars and theatres.  Missing in this equation is organic residential development around historic cores and new residential development appropriate to create a city.  The missing piece of Belfast’s puzzle is dense residential development typical of urban environments.
We are interested in exploring the issues which have frustrated urban living in Belfast and the opportunities that supporting a vibrant urban centre can bring to the city and region.  Clearly defining the development and architectural typologies that can successfully infuse the city with both small and large scale residential development is the focus of FCBS Belfast study on residential development in the city. There are plenty of landmarks, we just need a place to live.


Open call
We are asking for proposals for an artwork reflecting the ‘housing’ themes and interests outlined above. The selected entrant will receive £750 to be used to develop and realise the artwork. The artwork will be exhibited in the FCBStudios Belfast offices in Spring 2017.

Please submit a PDF including:
 - Name, email, phone number and postal address
  - A written description of the proposal (500 words to include an outline of the idea and description of the exhibition contents). The work can be new or existing.
  - Given the nature of the brief, familiarity with the local context, Belfast in particular, is recommended. Please include a short statement (150 words) on your connection and experience of Belfast.
 - A budget breakdown.
 - Up to 5 images or material to support the proposed idea (optional).

Additional info:
 - The medium can be of any suitable to the environment (images of the office available on request). Please be aware however that this space is adjacent to the main office environment so the inclusion of flashing / bright lights or sound etc. would not be deemed suitable.
 - Groups and collectives can apply.
 - Catering for the launch event will be covered separate to the £750.
 - The exhibition run and dates will be decided in conversation with the selected individual/group.
 - The exhibition space will be open to the public during office hours.
 - A selection panel will consist of members from FCBS, PLACE and the visual arts sector in Belfast. Feedback on unsuccessful proposals will be at the discretion of the panel.
 - There is no fee to enter.

Please send proposals to Brighdín Farren, [email protected] by 5pm on 20th January 2017. 

Monday, 31 October 2016

Art & Architecture | Exhibition & Events

Monday 7 November 2016
Black Box, 18-22 Hill St, Belfast BT1 2LA
Contact: +44(0) 28 9036 8963; [email protected]

Led by Ulster University's Transitional Justice Institute with local artist David Turner and architect Michael Wilkinson, we will reimagine the peace walls as spaces for sharing and for learning about all sides of the community.
David and Michael will explain their approach to design and demonstrate the creative process, and will then invite guests to attend the Ulster University's Art College on 8 and 10 November to come in and work on their own designs.
Background:
Artist David Turner and architect Michael Wilkinson have been working for 18 months on a cross-disciplinary, multi faceted project, 'The Theoretical Re-development of Belfast'. While both are firmly grounded in their artistic and architectural practice respectively, they are both conceptually driven. Their work progresses through a mutual understanding that no constraints be placed on ideas. This allows for any and all possibilities and outcomes to be evaluated. No ideas are bad ideas.
Between artist and architect, the project is envisaged as a multi faceted Urban Regeneration project. It seeks to Reimagine the City of Belfast and use this as a catalyst to promote good design throughout the Provence of Ulster. The work is largely artistic in conception and explores many avenues. It is a beginning and a process rather than a conclusion.

Monday, 24 October 2016

StreetSpace - Mapping Castle Street Workshop


 You are invited to the workshop: ‘Mapping Castle Street: an interdisciplinary workshop about the character of the street’, in PLACE on November 17-18, 2016.



Streets are scenes of conflict. They are contested public spaces where fundamentally different people can meet. Architects, planners, designers and policy makers have designed, managed and controlled the way streets are used, occupied and transited. Academics have raised awareness of the value of streets that are diverse, vibrant and inclusive, while urban policy focuses on the commercial value of city streets, and urban designers in their aesthetic and formal qualities. 

But what makes a good street? Is it the boundaries and thresholds created by buildings binding it? Is it the use of those buildings? Or is it the street’s identity, history and memory?

We will develop a series of layers of analysis including but not limited to: mapping, drawings, diagrams, photographs, interviews, archive work, soundscapes, and more.

We are not looking for a universal solution to the use, design and management of streets, but a culturally specific array of possibilities that our streets could potentially have. 

Castle Street is an ideal case study to consider, for it is in the core of the city, it connects very different areas, and above all it is loaded with meaning and potential.

We invite students, academics and professionals of architecture, planning, anthropology, sociology, history, psychology, film, media, arts and any other disciplines interested in the analysis of public space.

Join us for two days of exploration!

The workshop is free of charge.

Location: PLACE,  7-9 Lower Garfield Street. Belfast
Date: Thursday 17 and Friday 18 November 2016, 10am - 5pm

Please RSVP Agustina Martire to confirm your attendance before November 16th. [email protected]

Facebook event: Check for updates on presentations and participants.

Tuesday, 11 October 2016

StreetSpace Reading Group, QUB


Streets are scenes of conflict. They are contested public spaces where fundamentally different people can meet. Architects, planners, designers and policy makers have designed, managed and controlled the way streets are used, occupied and transited. Academics have raised awareness of the value of streets that are diverse, vibrant and inclusive, while urban policy has many times focused on the commercial value of city streets, and urban design practice focuses on the formal and aesthetic principles that constitute a good street.

But what makes a good street? Is it the boundaries and thresholds created by buildings binding it? Is it the programme and use of those buildings? Or is it the street’s identity, history and memory? How different is a street defined by one single block building, from a succession of diverse plot sized buildings? Do these physical elements affect the use and perception of the street?

This reading group will explore different approaches to the analysis of streets as public spaces. We invite students, academics and professionals of architecture, planning, anthropology, sociology, history, psychology, film, media, arts and any other disciplines interested in the analysis of public space.

Location: Training room 6 - The Graduate School - Queen’s University Belfast
Dates: Thursdays 12.30pm
13 October / 3 November / 8 December

First Reading: Appleyard, D., Gerson, M. S., & Lintell, M. (1981). Livable streets. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Please RSVP Agustina Martire to confirm your attendance. [email protected]
Please bring your own lunch and coffee.
Facebook event:
Link to first text:

Wednesday, 20 April 2016

Book Launch: 'Dark Days and Brighter Days for Northern Ireland Railways 1973-2013' by Edwin McMillan

New title from Newtownards-based Colourpoint Books launches tomorrow, Thursday 21 April at 12:30. To coincide with the 40th birthday of Central Station later this month, the launch will take place on the station's concourse. 

The launch will be attended by the publisher, the author, and Translink's Chief Operating Officer, Philip O’Neill, as well as other key staff. 


About the book
The railway system that makes up Northern Ireland Railways was formed in 1967 and remains open to this day despite threats of closure and the devastating effects of the ‘Troubles’. This new book records its history through the eyes of the author, an NIR employee for 40 years.

With interesting stories and much first-hand detail, this volume recounts the frequent dark days on this small network. On many occasions throughout the ‘Troubles’ there was disruption to train services; buildings and infrastructure were targeted; rolling stock destroyed; and passengers and staff were killed and injured. 

However, railway staff, including the author himself, had a determination to keep services running, many putting their lives at risk in the process.

On the brighter side, and through all adversity, Belfast Central Railway was re-opened; the Cross-Harbour Rail Link was constructed; railway routes and stations were re-opened; relaying of track continued; new stations were built; and new generations of trains were brought onto the railway.

Documented in detail, and featuring a comprehensive and unique timeline of incidents during the ‘Troubles’, this record of NIR is illustrated with many images from the author’s own personal collection.

This title is available to purchase now from www.colourpoint.co.uk, £18

Wednesday, 13 April 2016

Belfast School of Architecture presents 'Harbinder Birdi: Integrating Infrastructure'

This Thursday, 14 April, Harbinder Birdi, Head of Infrastructure at Hawkins\Brown architects will be discussing the practice’s approach to integrating major infrastructure projects into our cities. Examples will include three of the central section Crossrail stations, a new station bridge in Croydon and the proposals for Heathrow City, which explores the transformation of Heathrow's existing infrastructure from an international aviation hub to being redeveloped to house the communities in outer London.

Thursday 14 April 2016 | 6:00PM
Conor Lecture Theatre
Ulster University, Belfast Campus


Harbinder Birdi is a senior Partner at Hawkins\Brown, an award-winning architectural practice that has a reputation as one of the leading design practices in the UK. He is the Principle Architect delivering the designs of Tottenham Court Road, Bond Street and Liverpool Street station, three of the central section Crossrail stations and has collaborated extensively with both engineering and contractor led multidisciplinary teams, delivering projects utilising 3D modelling software to aid both the design and construction of these projects. Harbinder is an external critic at Schools of Architecture and lectures in both professional practice and multi-disciplinary design. He is also a previous winner of ’40 under 40’, a prestigious design award recognizing the best young architects under 40.

QUB Architecture Society Presents 'OMA Talk: Chris Van Duijn'

QUB Architecture and QUB Architecture Society are delighted to invite you to a lecture by Chris van Duijn.

Chris is one of the nine partners of OMA, a leading international architectural practice founded by Rem Koolhaas in 1975 in Rotherdam, The Netherlands. 

OMA’s buildings and masterplans around the world and their theories have been influential in contemporary architecture for generations. Please read more about Chris' work at OMA here: 
http://oma.eu/partners/chris-van-duijn.

Monday 18 April | 5PM
The Ashby, room GM/001, QUB, Stranmillis Road, Belfast
The talk is open to all and free of charge. 

Symposium: Belfast School of Architecture Presents 'Smart Working: Re-design of the public sector workplace environment'

For some time now, it has been well understood that the often complex variables impacting upon the design of the workplace (buildings, work patterns, technology, workforce & inter-generational expectations, etc.) can and should be managed if the public sector is to occupy 21st C. office space that is fit for purpose. Understanding this takes us beyond simplistic real estate metrics and into a procurement process that is much more holistic, analytical and responsive.

In partnership with the Strategic Investment Board, Belfast School of Architecture is offering this free, one-day symposium, hosted at Ulster University. It will look at key design, procurement and implementation issues underpinning ‘smart working’ in the UK government sector and some of the challenges they present in the design of our buildings and cities.

Friday 15 April 2016 | 9:15AM - 4PM
Ulster University, 25-51 York St, Belfast, BT15 1ED
Free but limited capacity, click here to book

Friday, 1 April 2016

Ráth: An Exhibition of Landscape as Infrastructure


Monday 4 - Saturday 23 April 2016
Special lunchtime event, 1-2pm, Tuesday 5 April
PLACE, 7-9 Lower Garfield Street, Belfast, BT1 1FP


We're delighted to be hosting this beautiful exhibition of work emerging from the Masters of Architecture studio in UCD exploring Landscape and Infrastructure around Lough Foyle and the Foyle river valley.

Wednesday, 2 March 2016

Upcoming Exhibition | Identifying Place: An exhibition to showcase investigative works from Master of Architecture students at Ulster University and Queens University Belfast

15-18 March 2016
Opening event Tuesday 15 March 5-7pm
PLACE
7-9 Lower Garfield Street
BT6 0DJ
belfast
north street : smithfield + union

PLACE is delighted to host this collaborative exhibition, displaying the approaches of our two architecture schools to neighbouring areas of the city. 

Students from QUB SPACE explore North Street as one of the few remaining architecturally and socially diverse public spaces in Belfast City Centre. The Masters of Architecture project, led by urban designer Michael Corr and lecturer in architecture Agustina Martire, analyses North Street within an urban context that  is fractured, divided by motorways, car parks, empty buildings, and large retail buildings. Within this seemingly bleak urban landscape, North Street still offers a complex vibrancy and diversity. Current redevelopment plans, however, threaten the mere existence of such streets in Belfast. The project highlights the value of North Street in its complexity and diversity.

The adjacent Smithfield+Union neighbourhood - between present day Castle Court, Millfield/Carrick Hill, Royal Avenue, and the expanding Ulster University Campus - was once an area outside the city walls that developed around the historic routes of North Street and Donegall Street. It is the original home to Smithfield Market and Haymarket, and contains some of the city's oldest streets and listed Victorian and Art Deco buildings. Over the last forty years however, the area has been both neglected and subject to multiple large-scale redevelopment schemes that have left high levels of derelict or vacant properties, and surface car parks; remaining areas are under threat.  

In this context, as part of an Ulster University Master of Architecture studio coordinated by Lecturer Saul Golden, students have been documenting the physical fabric and the life of the neighbourhood through drawings, models, photography, and film. They present a snapshot of what exists and what is rapidly disappearing along the North Street artery and surrounding areas, to promote discussions about the neighbourhood’s future and its connections with the wider city.

Tuesday, 16 February 2016

Open Lecture: 'Like Humans Do'

Architecture at Queen's is pleased to invite you to the lecture: 'Like Humans Do', by Riccardo Marini from world renowned Gehl Architects.

Tuesday 23 February, 1PM
Room LG111, David Keir Building, Stranmillis Road


This lecture is part of the lecture series of History and Theory of Architecture at Queen's University Belfast.



Tuesday, 9 February 2016

Cinema and the City Presents: Ports & Harbours/ Places and Films

9 February - 10 May
Black Box
Hill Street
BT1 2LA
FREE ENTRY

As part of their ongoing work exploring the relationship between Cinema and City, QUB research group CACity present a new film series looking at ports and harbours. 

The first screening is on 9th February at 5.30pm in the Black Box, and features four short films about Belfast by members of CACity, followed by 1966 film 'Battle of Algiers'. 

All welcome!

Places and Film Nights is a collaboration between Film and Architecture, Ulster University Belfast Schools of Architecture, Glass Eye Ciné, and CACity QUB.

Contact: [email protected]